Ballot Box 2020: The US Election

OxPol, the blog of Oxford’s Department of Politics and International Relations, is seeking contributions for a new series on the upcoming 2020 US elections. We invite work from academics, researchers, students and those in the policy world to comment on the ongoing campaign season. 

OxPol, the blog of Oxford’s Department of Politics and International Relations, is seeking contributions for a new series on the upcoming 2020 US elections. We invite work from academics, researchers, students and those in the policy world to comment on the ongoing campaign season. Potential topics include, but are in no way limited to:

  • Party polarisation and/or centrism
  • Media coverage and the perils or popularity of polling
  • Voting blocks and lessons from the 2018 midterm results
  • Historic candidacies and preferences among minority voters
  • Voter turnout and suppression
  • Campaign finance and fundraising
  • Evaluation of candidate platforms on climate, healthcare, wealth, infrastructure, education, etc.
  • Non-presidential elections to watch from local government and ballot initiatives to the Senate and House of Representatives
  • Foreign government interests and implications of results for international relations

All posts should be 500-1,000 words in length. Ideally, we will build a group of authors who would like to contribute semi-regularly (3-4 times) between now and November, though we will also accept individual submissions.

As is the case with all OxPol posts, we primarily wish to provide a forum for authors to share how the insights of their research or work can help us understand current events. We will also consider publishing commentary/opinion pieces about the election when these are supported by or provide a counterargument to research findings. We seek to offer a platform for diverse voices and analysis not featured elsewhere and welcome political, historical, economic, sociological and interdisciplinary perspectives.
If you are interested in writing for this series or would like to ask any questions, please get in touch with us at blog@politics.ox.ac.uk

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